We have been very interested to learn the findings of the recent survey suggesting that, despite greater or more frequent obstacles, women are less likely to fail in business than men. This is something we have seen with our clients time and time again and yet discrimination against women in the workplace persists.

Read more about the survey and the findings here

 

As one of the very few law firms specialising in revenge pornography we know that while victims/survivors certainly want to seek justice against the perpetrator, more than anything they want the abuse to end: they want the pictures and videos removed.  The current law offers limited support.

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Lately the news has been full of striking examples of how the Internet has been turned into a potent tool to abuse women; providing perpetrators with the anonymity to remotely stalk, harass, extort or post indecent images that are instantly available to the world and extremely difficult to take down. The UK Crown Prosecution Service noted in a recent report, detailing a record increase in the number of people prosecuted for violence against women and girls, that the use of the Internet to target women is a common motif.

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Women have typically borne the burden of childcare within the child’s first year, often resulting in temporary or permanent disruption to their careers.  To minimise this female-gendered burden, the UK’s Parental Leave policy, previously reserved for mothers only, has now been formally amended to include fathers. The new Shared Parental Leave and Pay policy, which went into effect in April, enables both parents to participate on equal terms.

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Yesterday Google announced it would stop its searches linking to “revenge porn” images if requested by a person whose image has been posted without consent.  We applaud Google for taking this important step.

We’ve been working to fight revenge porn, through representing clients like Chrissy Chambers and in campaigning, lobbying and giving speeches in the US and UK trying to make this practice a clear violation of the law both criminal and civil.   Google’ new policy clearly focuses on the consent of the person as the standard, which is better than the one used in many criminal statutes including the new one we worked to pass in Britain. They only punish the perpetrator if he intends to “cause distress” to the person depicted, and don’t offer any way to get the images taken down – leaving no practical recourse for someone whose images were hacked, or reposted for “kicks,” or because sites make money spreading them around.  Really, a better term than “revenge porn” for describing all of these cruel practices is “non-consensual pornography.”  By removing non-consensual pornographic images from its search results as Google has now agreed to do, it will help starve them of the oxygen they need to spread, and steer the internet away from permitting anonymous cowards to make people’s lives a living hell with impunity.

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